This Month

This Month September 2021 - Tuesday, 31 Aug 2021

 I recently had a very exciting time having a personal tour around a plant hunters garden and nursery and I gave a good impression of a kiddie in a sweet shop. Needless to say I came home with a full car, a very full car, some trees were lying on their side stretching from the very front to very back of the car. I did stop half way home to have a piece of cake and drink and just squeeze a few more plants in the car. Well it was only 43 plants in total, I will not say how many of these are trees!
I have two new Schefflera, S. macrophylla and S. fantsipanensis which has the name unconfirmed, but it has such delicious leaves I couldn’t resist, these should grow to about 16ft (5m). Two Viburnum, V.cylindrical and V. arboriculum both make small trees, another small tree is Mallotus japonicas. Brassaiopsis has been on my wish list since I first saw a picture of it so I was extremely happy to obtain Brassaiopsis dumicola which has very deeply lobed large leaves that any description from me would not do justice. It is also good for insects, but so are most plants when grown in in such variety, it is when there are monocultures they become barren and lifeless such as the dull lawns many people seem to think a necessary feature of their gardens.
I have more trees and shrubs mostly bought for their leaf shape plus quite a lot of lower plants for part shade or shade. The larger plants mostly say wind shelter but as the nursery was north west Wales between Snowdon and the coast I am hoping they would not get so windswept here, although I expect there will be other issues they will have to contend with. Of the herbaceous plants I have three lovely Rodgersia, these are R. sambucifolia, R. pinnata Shangri-La and R. napalense High Flier, as you may guess the later is not low, growing to 6ft (2m). One ground cover plant is Mitella stylosa which has glossy green and red leaves, I already have Mitella brewerii but there is no comparison to the attractiveness with the later appearing quite dull. I also bought an herbaceous Sambucus which I had never seen or heard of before, it has bright orange berries and may be a bit of a goer so I will have to think carefully where to put it so it doesn’t take over other plants.
I am really going to have to work the brain cells hard trying to decide the ideal position for them all but one morning a volunteer helped me to dig out most of the ferns in the wild fernery. I left a few around the edge then later in the day I wandered back down to have another look at the area and took out some more wild ferns that were on the edge of the cultivated fernery to leave gaps between the remainder to see through to the new area waiting to be planted when we have had more rain. It is usually quite a moist area but with the limited rainfall over summer even parts of this area are dry. There are already a few trees and shrubs planted here but I will infill with several of the new ones so they can protect each other from the elements, although I will put the hardiest on the lower edge where the worst of any wind comes from, these will have to be plants that don’t mind a bit of sun whereas most of the area does not get direct sun even though it is not deep shade.
In the meantime I have been working far too hard getting the long grass cut and cleared, yesterday I did three strims, not really a clever idea but all the less left to do on other days. It was made more difficult by my strimmer breaking, a bolt sheared off, but a very kind near neighbour lent me theirs.
 I recently had a very exciting time having a personal tour around a plant hunters garden and nursery and I gave a good impression of a kiddie in a sweet shop. Needless to say I came home with a full car, a very full car, some trees were lying on their side stretching from the very front to very back of the car. I did stop half way home to have a piece of cake and drink and just squeeze a few more plants in the car. Well it was only 43 plants in total, I will not say how many of these are trees!
I have two new Schefflera, S. macrophylla and S. fantsipanensis which has the name unconfirmed, but it has such delicious leaves I couldn’t resist, these should grow to about 16ft (5m). Two Viburnum, V.cylindrical and V. arboriculum both make small trees, another small tree is Mallotus japonicas. Brassaiopsis has been on my wish list since I first saw a picture of it so I was extremely happy to obtain Brassaiopsis dumicola which has very deeply lobed large leaves that any description from me would not do justice. It is also good for insects, but so are most plants when grown in in such variety, it is when there are monocultures they become barren and lifeless such as the dull lawns many people seem to think a necessary feature of their gardens.
I have more trees and shrubs mostly bought for their leaf shape plus quite a lot of lower plants for part shade or shade. The larger plants mostly say wind shelter but as the nursery was north west Wales between Snowdon and the coast I am hoping they would not get so windswept here, although I expect there will be other issues they will have to contend with. Of the herbaceous plants I have three lovely Rodgersia, these are R. sambucifolia, R. pinnata Shangri-La and R. napalense High Flier, as you may guess the later is not low, growing to 6ft (2m). One ground cover plant is Mitella stylosa which has glossy green and red leaves, I already have Mitella brewerii but there is no comparison to the attractiveness with the later appearing quite dull. I also bought an herbaceous Sambucus which I had never seen or heard of before, it has bright orange berries and may be a bit of a goer so I will have to think carefully where to put it so it doesn’t take over other plants.
I am really going to have to work the brain cells hard trying to decide the ideal position for them all but one morning a volunteer helped me to dig out most of the ferns in the wild fernery. I left a few around the edge then later in the day I wandered back down to have another look at the area and took out some more wild ferns that were on the edge of the cultivated fernery to leave gaps between the remainder to see through to the new area waiting to be planted when we have had more rain. It is usually quite a moist area but with the limited rainfall over summer even parts of this area are dry. There are already a few trees and shrubs planted here but I will infill with several of the new ones so they can protect each other from the elements, although I will put the hardiest on the lower edge where the worst of any wind comes from, these will have to be plants that don’t mind a bit of sun whereas most of the area does not get direct sun even though it is not deep shade.
In the meantime I have been working far too hard getting the long grass cut and cleared, yesterday I did three strims, not really a clever idea but all the less left to do on other days. It was made more difficult by my strimmer breaking, a bolt sheared off, but a very kind near neighbour lent me theirs.
 I recently had a very exciting time having a personal tour around a plant hunters garden and nursery and I gave a good impression of a kiddie in a sweet shop. Needless to say I came home with a full car, a very full car, some trees were lying on their side stretching from the very front to very back of the car. I did stop half way home to have a piece of cake and drink and just squeeze a few more plants in the car. Well it was only 43 plants in total, I will not say how many of these are trees!
I have two new Schefflera, S. macrophylla and S. fantsipanensis which has the name unconfirmed, but it has such delicious leaves I couldn’t resist, these should grow to about 16ft (5m). Two Viburnum, V.cylindrical and V. arboriculum both make small trees, another small tree is Mallotus japonicas. Brassaiopsis has been on my wish list since I first saw a picture of it so I was extremely happy to obtain Brassaiopsis dumicola which has very deeply lobed large leaves that any description from me would not do justice. It is also good for insects, but so are most plants when grown in in such variety, it is when there are monocultures they become barren and lifeless such as the dull lawns many people seem to think a necessary feature of their gardens.
I have more trees and shrubs mostly bought for their leaf shape plus quite a lot of lower plants for part shade or shade. The larger plants mostly say wind shelter but as the nursery was north west Wales between Snowdon and the coast I am hoping they would not get so windswept here, although I expect there will be other issues they will have to contend with. Of the herbaceous plants I have three lovely Rodgersia, these are R. sambucifolia, R. pinnata Shangri-La and R. napalense High Flier, as you may guess the later is not low, growing to 6ft (2m). One ground cover plant is Mitella stylosa which has glossy green and red leaves, I already have Mitella brewerii but there is no comparison to the attractiveness with the later appearing quite dull. I also bought an herbaceous Sambucus which I had never seen or heard of before, it has bright orange berries and may be a bit of a goer so I will have to think carefully where to put it so it doesn’t take over other plants.
I am really going to have to work the brain cells hard trying to decide the ideal position for them all but one morning a volunteer helped me to dig out most of the ferns in the wild fernery. I left a few around the edge then later in the day I wandered back down to have another look at the area and took out some more wild ferns that were on the edge of the cultivated fernery to leave gaps between the remainder to see through to the new area waiting to be planted when we have had more rain. It is usually quite a moist area but with the limited rainfall over summer even parts of this area are dry. There are already a few trees and shrubs planted here but I will infill with several of the new ones so they can protect each other from the elements, although I will put the hardiest on the lower edge where the worst of any wind comes from, these will have to be plants that don’t mind a bit of sun whereas most of the area does not get direct sun even though it is not deep shade.
In the meantime I have been working far too hard getting the long grass cut and cleared, yesterday I did three strims, not really a clever idea but all the less left to do on other days. It was made more difficult by my strimmer breaking, a bolt sheared off, but a very kind near neighbour lent me theirs.



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